Friday September 21, 2018
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Mississippi's 10 Worst Invasive Weeds


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PDF 2 pages 10 weeds identified by Faye Winters, District Wildlife Biologist, Bureau of Land Management; John D. Byrd, Jr., Extension Weed Specialist, Mississippi State University; and Charles T. Bryson, Research Botanist, USDA-ARS.

YOU CAN HELP STOP THE INVASION!
? Refrain from planting Mississippi?s ?ten worst weeds.? Appealing as some may be, these plants are all notorious for invading outlying areas.
? Use nursery-raised native plants. Ask your local nursery staff for suggestions, or check out native gardening books from your local library or bookstore.
? Remove these plants from your property. If needed, contact your county Extension agent for recommended methods of chemical control. Use herbicides carefully. Many herbicides are not selective and will kill all surrounding vegetation or may harm aquatic systems.
? Help control exotic plants on nearby public lands. This can be an educational and productive activity for scouts, 4-H clubs, and other service groups. Check with your local forest, refuge, or park for exotic plant removal projects.

ALLIGATORWEED
(Alternanthera philoxeroides) Native to South America. Appeared in the United States about 1890.

CHINESE TALLOW TREE
(Popcorn Tree) (Triadica sebifera) Native to Eastern Asia. Imported to South Carolina in the late 1700?s and later used in soap-making.

JAPANESE HONEYSUCKLE
(Lonicera japonica) Native to Japan. First introduced to Long Island, New York, in 1862.

CHINESE PRIVET
(Ligustrum sinense) Native to China. Introduced in the United States as an ornamental shrub in 1852.

COGONGRASS
(Imperata cylindrica) Native to Southeast Asia. Arrived accidentally as packing material into Mobile Bay, Alabama, in the early 1900?s. It was later promoted as a forage grass and as an ornamental.

JOHNSONGRASS
(Sorghum halepense) Native to the Mediterranean region. Came to the United States as a forage plant in early 1800?s.

KUDZU
(Pueraria lobata) Native to Japan and Asia. Showcased as an ornamental at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876. In Mississippi, it was planted to control widespread soil erosion that plagued the state in the last half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century.

TROPICAL SODA APPLE
(Solanum viarum) Native to Brazil and Argentina. First recorded in Glades County, Florida in 1988.

PURPLE LOOSESTRIFE
(Lythrum salicaria) Native to Eurasia. Introduced for ornamental and medicinal uses in 1800?s.

WATER HYACINTH
(Eichornia crassipes) Native to the Amazon Basin and South America. Imported into the United States as an aquatic ornamental in 1884.


Click on Regional Links below for additional selections:
Regions impacted: (See related documents in region) Southeast, Southern

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This product was added to our catalog on Saturday November 06, 2010.

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